Creating a realistic revision plan

Creating a realistic revision plan

Hi loves, I hope you are all well! In my pervious post I spoke about wanting to create better content on my blog and really put in all the effort I can after having a lil’ break but since that post, I and everyone else in their final year of school have been hit with a load of mock exams in November (woohoo) which will be consuming most of my free time revising when I’d usually be blogging. Especially seen as it’s half term when I was looking forward to dedicating more time to my blog and having good old break from school work but hey ho that’s year 11 for ya. I thought instead of letting the revision take up all my free time, I would have a time of not revising (yes you heard it, having a break is allowed) and write this post on creating a realistic revision plan that you can stick to and tips that will hopefully help some of you who are studying for exams like myself, especially GCSE’s at the end of the year as I know I have found the idea of a lot of exams at once quite daunting!

Plan and start revising early (but not too early)

All I seem to be hearing at the moment is teachers constantly nagging at us to ‘start revising NOW’ which can be quite overwhelming and create unwanted stress. Although starting revising now in good time so you don’t end up cramming everything in at the end is a good thing, it is also important to not go too full force, hard core revising and put pressure on yourself. By the time of the exams you want to feel prepared and ready but not totally shattered. My advice would be to start revising now little and often for example reviewing your notes after each lesson to re visit them and to make sure you understand everything.

Start your day with something you can accomplish ( be realistic)

Setting yourself with a reachable goal each day for you that you can accomplish will motivate you to revise for example setting yourself to revise the whole of p5 in science rather than trying to revise the whole of physics.

Give yourself regular breaks

Like I mentioned, having regularly breaks is a must when it comes to revision as your brain gets to a point where the information just isn’t going in and it needs a rest from intaking a lot of information. As long as you are strict with yourself and have done a good amount of revision, having a well earned break for a snack or whatever it may be is important to take so you can then go back to revising with a fresh state of mind. When revising there must be an equal balance of work and breaks.

Use all the resources available (they are there to help you!)

It is often difficult to know actually how to revise and although there are lots of ways for example making flash cards and mind maps etc, make sure to use all the resources available to you such as revision guides, online past papers and all those types of things which are there to help you. Everyone revises differently and has the type of revision that works best for them but it really does help if you make use of everything available to you. Instead of reading through your text books for example, it might be helpful to make new notes from revision guides or if you get stuck on a practice question, use revision guides, bitesize etc to find the answer-don’t give up!

Find the right environment to revise

I feel this is so important to find the right, clear space which you feel comfortable revising at whether that be at your desk, at the dining table or wherever you feel revising best at.

Refresh your notes regularly

This may seem an obvious one but although making notes is great, making sure you go over them regularly will help you remember them better and keep refreshing your memory of them. Also, if you are struggling with a particular area, focussing on your strengths and weaknesses by spending more time on it to make sure you understand it is so important rather than spending lots of time going over things you already know.

Make it strict yet flexible

Another important thing is to determine when you study best for example when your mind is fresh in the morning or perhaps on an afternoon. If you are however busy one morning when you usually revise, you can always change your timetable/routine and switch to revising on an afternoon that day instead and make it flexible. As long as you make up for the missed time, don’t pannic!

Don’t put it off & Stick to the plan!

Finally, but most importantly stick to your plan and don’t put off revising! I know I’m guilty of wasting time and making excuses of ‘I’ll do that later’ and then never actually get round to doing it. In reality, we would much rather be doing something else other than revising and are truthfully sick of the word ‘REVISION’ but as long as you have the right balance of revision and your own time, it should make it that bit less overwhelming and lighten the load by chipping away at a comfortable speed. Although the teachers would disagree, you do have a lot of time before the real exams if you start now and please don’t let anyone stress you out about it! As long as you don’t leave it all to the end and try your best, that’s all they can ask of you!

I hope this may have helped some of you who are in the same position as me at the moment being faced with a tone of exams which might seem like the end of the world but I promise you, it’s not and we will smash those exams! Being faced with exams and trying to revise for them all isn’t easy but trust me, getting stressed out about them isn’t going to help the situation like I have learnt and revision can be made manageable. After experiencing GCSE’s in year 10, they really aren’t all that bad. Sitting down and planning out a realistic revision plan that you can do each day will hopefully make you feel a lot more organised. Creating a revision timetable or finding a template of one online (see an example one below) might also be useful that you can put on your desk, up on your wall or wherever you like to remind you what you should be revising at what time each week. You totally don’t have to do this though.

Thank you so much for reading as always & let me know if you have any tips for revision??

Good luck in your mock exams lovelies!

(Click here for revision timetable)

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2 Comments

  1. October 24, 2017 / 5:35 pm

    This is the perfect post and has come up at the perfect time! I’m in year 11 aswell and in my school they made us do mock exams on the second week back. They told us that on the last week of year 10 but I barely revised anything because I was so busy this summer. My school did that to show us how it would feel if we didn’t put the effort in and everyone was so down after getting the results

    My next mocks are in January so I will definitely take these tips in mind. Also, I’ve created a revision timetable for this holiday and for term 2. I’m making flashcards with questions for each topic for each subject so than it takes the work load off next year during revision time. Instead of making revision materials next year, I’ll have more time questioning and improving my learning. I’m going to check out your revision timetable right now! Lovely post as always xx

  2. October 26, 2017 / 5:49 pm

    These are such helpful tips for revision, I totally use loads of them! I find it is always good to make them flexible as it’s IMPOSSIBLE just to sit there all day, I always find myself wondering to the fridge or my laptop haha! I love to start as early as possible, so then early evening I can just CHILL with the family, or catch up with whatever I’ve missed during the day! Loved the post! xx

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